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EADP 3010: Principles of Emergency Management: Articles

A guide to library resources for EADP 3010 students

Where to Start

I suggest that you start your search for scholarly articles in one of the databases in the journal article databases box below or in the UNT Libraries' "Find Articles" search in the box underneath the suggested databases.  "Find Articles" simultaneously searches within almost all of the UNT Libraries' subscription databases.  Your "Find Articles" search results will be multidisciplinary.

You may also try searching or browsing within individual emergency management journals, for articles, such as the ones listed below--

Journal Article Databases

Find Articles

Limit To Only:

InterLibrary Loan

Need a book or article not in print or online at UNT Libraries? Use Interlibrary Loan. Create & use your ILLiad account.

Search Tips

In general, when searching the library databases...

Keywords are...

  • A good way to start a search.
  • The important concepts in your own words.
  • Found anywhere in the article (title, author, subject terms, etc.).

Use Quotation Marks to Search for a Phrase...

  • Searching for "Quality of life" will bring back only results that have the words in that exact order.

Connecting the concepts (keywords)...

  • Link different parts of your topic with "AND" to get results that contain both terms.
  • Join similar ideas or synonyms with "OR" to find results that contain either of the terms.
  • Exclude concepts with "NOT" 

Search for a root word...

  • Add an * at the end of a word to search for all possible endings/suffixes 
  • teen* will search for teen, teens, teenager, teenagers

Limit to Peer-Reviewed, Refereed or Scholarly articles...

  • Peer-review is part of the publication & editorial process for academic and research journals.  Being peer-reviewed is a sign that a paper's author(s) have done a certain level of due diligence in their work and their research is complete, manages conflicts-of-interest, and is fair and objective.

Narrow the Date Range...

  • When looking for current research limit your date range to the last 5-10 years.

Still not finding anything?  Ask your Librarian!

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