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EDEC 5800: Special Topics: Teacher Research and Inquiry

useful library information for EDEC 5800: Special Topics: Teacher Research and Inquiry, Dr. April Larremore

Required Readings for EDEC 5800

Bissex, G. (1986). On becoming teacher experts: What’s a teacher-researcher? Language Arts, 63(5), 482-484
Blaise, M. (2005). Researching with children in the early childhood classroom. In Playing it straight: Uncovering gender discourses in the early childhood classroom, (35-54). Milton Park, Abingdon: Routledge. 
Dana, N.F., & Yendol-Hoppey, D. (2020). Making your inquiry public. In The reflective educator’s guide to classroom research: Learning to teach and teaching to learn through practitioner inquiry, (pp. 209-247). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
Dana, N.F., & Yendol-Hoppey, D. (2020). Starting your journey: Finding a wondering. In The reflective educator’s guide to classroom research: Learning to teach and teaching to learn through practitioner inquiry, (pp. 25-66). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
Dyson, A.H. & Genishi, C. (2005).  On the case:  Approaches to language and literacy research.  New York, NY: Teachers College Press.
Gallas, K. (1994). Chapter 1: On being an aboriginal: A model for teacher research. In Languages of learning: How children talk, write, dance, draw, and sing their understanding of the world (pp. 1-11). New York, NY: Teachers College Press.
Graue, M. E., & Walsh, D. J. (1998). Theory as context. In Studying children in context: Theories, methods, and ethics, (pp. 24-54). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
Hubbard, R.S., & Power, B.M. (2003). The art of classroom inquiry. New York, NY: Heinemann.
Kutz, E. Teacher research: Myths and realities. Language Arts, 69(3), 193-197.
MacNaughton, G., & Hughes, P. (2009). Phase One: Choosing to change. In Doing action research in early childhood studies: A step by step guide, (7-33). New York, NY: Open University Press. 
MacNaughton, G., & Hughes, P. (2009). Phase Two: Planning for change. In Doing action research in early childhood studies: A step by step guide, (55-76). New York, NY: Open University Press. 
MacNaughton, G., & Hughes, P. (2009). Phase Three: Creating change. In Doing action research in early childhood studies: A step by step guide, (171-204). New York, NY: Open University Press. 
Mukherji, P., & Albon, D. (2010). Chapter 14: Creative methods for listening to children in research. In Research methods in early childhood: An introductory guide, (pp. 169-179). Los Angeles, CA: Sage Publications
Neimark, A. (2014). Do you want to see something goofy? Peer culture in the preschool yard. Voices of Practitioners, 3(1), 1-11.
Paciga, K. (2011). Reading, writing, and sharing: The journey to become kindergarten authors. In C. Pappas & E. Tucker-Raymond (Eds.), Becoming a teacher researcher in literacy teaching and learning (pp. 90-105). New York, NY: Routledge.
Pacini-Ketchabaw, V., Nxumalo, F., Kocher, L., Elliot, E., & Sanchez, A. (2015). Chapter 2: Reflecting critically. In Journeys: Reconceptualizing early childhood practices through pedagogical narration, (23-44). North York, Ontario, Canada: University of Toronto Press. 
Pankratz, L.M. (2015). Building with blocks: Incorporating picture books to motivate and guide block play in kindergarten. Voices of Practitioners, 10(2), 64-79.
Pappas, C., & Tucker-Raymond, E. (2011). Chapter 1: So, what is teacher research anyway?. In Becoming a teacher researcher in literacy teaching and learning (pp. 3-11). New York, NY: Routledge.
Pappas, C., & Tucker-Raymond, E. (2011). Chapter 2: Creating your research questions: The first step in inquiry. In Becoming a teacher researcher in literacy teaching and learning (pp. 12-17). New York, NY: Routledge.
Pappas, C., & Tucker-Raymond, E. (2011). Chapter 3: Planning your inquiry. In Becoming a teacher researcher in literacy teaching and learning (pp. 18-29). New York, NY: Routledge.
Pappas, C., & Tucker-Raymond, E. (2011). Chapter 5: Strategies for data collection. In Becoming a teacher researcher in literacy teaching and learning (pp. 37-55). New York, NY: Routledge.
Pappas, C., & Tucker-Raymond, E. (2011). Chapter 7: Writing up your inquiry as an evocative account? In Becoming a teacher researcher in literacy teaching and learning (pp. 71-85). New York, NY: Routledge.  
Phillips, D.K., & Carr, K.M. (2010). Becoming a teacher through action research: Process, context, and self-study. New York, NY: Routledge.
Solomon, J. (2016). Gender identity and expression in the early childhood classroom: Influence on development within sociocultural contexts. Voices of Practitioners, 1-12.
Wall, S. V. (2004). Writing the “self” in teacher research: The potential powers of a new professional discourse. English Education, 36(4), 289-317.
Wien, C.A. (2004). From policing to participation: Overturning the rules and creating amiable classrooms. Young Children, 59, 1-7.
Wien, C.A., & Kirby-Smith, S. (1998). Untiming the curriculum: A case study of removing clocks from the program. Young Children, 53(5), 8-13.
Wood. J.W. (2013). Moses’s story: Critical literacy and social justice in an urban kindergarten. Voices of Practitioners, 1-12.

 

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